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TOKYO: Japan's road, rail and air travel services faced further disruptions Saturday, reports and officials said, after a fresh snow storm killed three people and injured 850 others following last week's deadly blizzard.

Snow began falling Friday morning in the capital Tokyo and piled up to 26 centimetres (10 inches) by early Saturday, a week after the heaviest snowfall in decades left at least 11 people dead and more than 1,200 injured across the nation.

A driver was killed Friday in a crash involving his car and a truck on an icy road in Shiga, central Japan, while a farmer died after a tractor overturned on a snow-covered road in southwestern Oita, local media said.

In a separate snow-related accident, a driver was killed and three others injured on an expressway in central Shizuoka, the news reports said.

Public broadcaster NHK said some 850 people, including one in a coma, have been injured in snow-related accidents across the nation since snow hit western Japan late Thursday.

Drivers were struggling to move their cars in the capital's residential district of Setagaya, while snow started melting and flooding some roads in downtown Tokyo.

Television footage showed hundreds of passengers resting on benches and floors under blankets at Haneda airport in Tokyo as public transport services were suspended due to heavy show.

At least 628 flights, mostly on domestic routes, were cancelled on Saturday at Haneda and other airports in eastern Japan, NHK said, a day after more than 260 flights were grounded due to heavy snow.

Two commuter trains collided at Motosumiyoshi station in Tokyo early Saturday leaving 19 passengers injured, officials said.

The accident occurred as train services were disrupted due to the storm but it was not immediately clear if the collision was directly related to the bad weather.

Transport authorities are investigating the case.

The storm also caused delays and suspensions on the “shinkansen” bullet train services and the closure of a number of highways across the country.

Some 187,000 households lost power mainly in eastern Japan due to snow and strong winds, NHK said.

The meteorological agency continued warning of heavy snow in eastern Japan as well as strong winds and high waves along coastal areas, which may cause snow slides.

Last week, as much as 27 centimetres of snow was recorded in Tokyo, the capital's worst snowfall for 45 years.

While much of that snow had melted, the remains of larger piles as well as some slightly diminished snowmen were still in evidence across the city.

WASHINGTON: The United States is condemning a deadly Taliban attack in Afghanistan, saying there is ''no possible justification'' for killing people who worked to help Afghans achieve a brighter future, whereas UN leader Ban Ki-moon vowed that the United Nations would maintain its work in Afghanistan despite the attack that killed four of its staff.

The US also is renewing its call for the Taliban to lay down its weapons and begin peace talks with the Afghan government.

White House spokesman Jay Carney says such a move is the surest way to bring a peaceful end to the conflict in Afghanistan.

The Taliban claimed responsibility for Friday's attack on a popular restaurant in Kabul, Afghanistan's capital and largest city.

Twenty-one people, including three American citizens working for the American University of Afghanistan, were killed.

The Taliban said the attack was in retaliation for an Afghan military operation earlier in the week.

The US ambassador to the United Nations, Samantha Power, slammed what she called a “craven attack.”

But she added in a statement that “the United States and the international community will not waver in its commitment to stand with the people of Afghanistan.”

The United States has promised to keep up its assistance to Afghanistan.

UNITED NATIONS UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon called the attack ''totally unacceptable.'' and vowed Saturday that the United Nations would maintain its work in Afghanistan despite a Taliban suicide attack that killed four of its staff.

The four were among 13 foreigners and eight Afghans who died when Taliban suicide attackers set off a bomb at a popular Kabul restaurant.

Ban paid tribute to Basra Hassan, a US citizen of Somali origin, Nasrin Jamal of Pakistan, both health specialists for the UN children's agency, Khanjar Wabel Abdallah of Lebanon and Vadim Nazarov of Russia.

“This is another sad moment for the United Nations where our distinguished four colleagues have been killed by a terrorist attack in Kabul,” he said in New York.

While condemning what he called a “reckless” terror attack, Ban said the world body would not be deterred from its work in Afghanistan, where it is helping the government organize elections as international troops withdraw.

“As the United Nations mourns this terrorist attack and its victims, we remain committed to work for the peace, stability and development of Afghanistan,” the secretary general said.

“We fully support the transition of Afghanistan toward a better future in peace, development and security,” he added.

Deadliest attack on foreigners A Taliban attack against a popular Kabul restaurant killed 21 people, authorities said Saturday, making it the deadliest single attack against foreign civilians in the course of a nearly 13-year U.S.-led war there now approaching its end.

The attack comes as security has been deteriorating and apprehension has been growing among Afghans over their country's future as U.S.-led foreign forces prepare for a final withdrawal at the end of the year.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai, who is deferring signing an agreement allowing US forces to stay past the planned withdrawal until after the country's April 5 presidential election, criticized America while condemning the attack.

''If NATO forces and in the lead the United States of America want to cooperate and be united with Afghan people, they must target terrorism,'' he said without fully elaborating on what America should be doing. He added that the US had followed a policy that ''was not successful in the past decade.''

The dead from Friday's assault against La Taverna du Liban included 13 foreigners and eight Afghans, all civilians.

The US Embassy in Kabul said late Saturday that three Americans were killed.

Previously, those identified included two US citizens working for the American University of Afghanistan and a victim identified by the United Nations as Basra Hassan, a Somali-American working as a nutrition specialist for Unicef.

Others identified were two Britons, development specialist Dharmender Singh Phangura and close protection officer Simon Chase, two Canadians who worked for a financial services firm, two Lebanese, a Danish police officer, a Russian, and a Malaysian. Phangura, who along with the Malaysian worked as an adviser for Adam Smith International, was to run as a Labour Party candidate in upcoming elections for the European Parliament.

Also among the dead were the International Monetary Fund's representative, Khanjar Wabel Abdallah of Lebanon; Nasreen Khan, a Unicef health specialist from Pakistan, and Vadim Nazarov, a Russian who was the chief political affairs officer at the UN Mission in Afghanistan.

Nazarov was one of the UN's most experienced officials, fluent in the country's languages and with experience dating back to the 1980s.

The attack was condemned by the UN Security Council, Nato, the White House and the European Union.

''There is no possible justification for this attack, which has killed innocent civilians, including Americans, working every day to help the Afghan people achieve a better future with higher education and economic assistance,'' the White House said in a statement Saturday.

Insurgents have frequently targeted foreign interests around the country and in Kabul.

The deadliest previous attack against foreign civilians was in Sept 8, 2012, when nine civilian employees of a private aviation company were killed in a suicide attack near the Kabul airport.

They included eight South Africans and a Kyrgyz.

The assault began Friday with a suicide bomber detonating his explosives at the front door of the restaurant, located in an area housing several embassies, non-governmental organisations and the homes and offices of Afghan officials.

As chaos ensued, the two other attackers entered through the kitchen and began shooting. They were later killed by security guards

The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, saying it was in reprisal for an Afghan military operation earlier in the week against insurgents in eastern Parwan province, which the insurgents claimed killed many civilians.

Afghan officials previously said that attack killed a Taliban leader, three of his family members, seven Taliban fighters and five civilians in a neighboring home from which insurgents were also firing on the Afghan commandos.

The Taliban frequently provide exaggerated casualty figures.

''The target of the attack was a restaurant frequented by high-ranking foreigners,'' Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in an emailed statement. He said the attack targeted a place ''where the invaders used to dine with booze and liquor in the plenty.''

He described the ''revenge attack'' as having delivered a ''heavy admonitory blow to the enemy which they shall never forget.''

The restaurant, like most places frequented by foreign diplomats, aid workers, journalists and businessmen in the war-weary country, has no signs indicating its location and is heavily secured.

It sits on a small side street just off a bumpy semi-paved road in a house with low ceilings and an enclosed patio but has no windows.

Bags of dirt are piled up around it to act as blast walls and guests must go through a series of steel airlocks, where they are searched, before entering the premises

DHAKA: A Bangladesh court on Tuesday ordered the arrest of the owners and four others over the country's worst-ever garment factory fire that killed 111 workers, after police laid charges.

The court in Dhaka issued the warrants for Delwar Hossain and his wife Mahmuda Akter over the blaze in 2012 at the Tazreen factory, where workers stitched clothes for Western retailers.

“Dhaka's senior judicial magistrate Wasim Sheikh issued the warrants of arrest against the two fugitive owners, Delwar Hossain and his wife Mahmuda Akter, and four other company officials for the Tazreen factory fire,”prosecutor Anwarul Kabir told AFP.

The fire on November 24, 2012, shone an international spotlight on appalling safety conditions in an industry worth more than $20 billion a year.

The factory, in the Ashulia industrial district, supplied clothes to a variety of international brands including US giant Walmart, Dutch retailer C&A and ENYCE, a label owned by US rapper Sean “Diddy” Combs.

Kabir said the court accepted charges by police against all 13 implicated in the fire after officers earlier this month completed a 13-month investigation into the tragedy.

“The owners and 11 others have been charged with arson, culpable homicide not amounting to murder and death by negligence,” Kabir said, adding that all the accused face a maximum life term in prison.

The six whose arrest was ordered were not in court or in custody.

Police last week said it was possibly the first time a garment plant owner has been charged over a fire at one of the nation's 4,500 factories, where deadly accidents are common.

Factory owners are rarely charged over such tragedies in the sector, which is a mainstay of the impoverished country's economy, accounting to up to 80 percent of Bangladesh's exports.

The country suffered an even greater tragedy just months later in April when the Rana Plaza garment factory complex collapsed in Dhaka's outskirts, killing 1,135 people in the world's worst industrial disaster.

MOSCOW: A female suicide bomber killed 14 people Sunday when she blew herself up at the main train station in the southern city of Volgograd, raising concerns about security in Russia just six weeks before the Sochi Olympic Games.

The unidentified woman set off her charge after being stopped by a police officer at the metal detectors at the entrance to the station while it was packed with people travelling to celebrate the New Year, regional officials said.

Footage of the blast captured by a nearby camera showed a huge fireball blow out the front doors and a row of windows from the grey stone three-story building, before huge billows of smoke poured out as people scattered along the street.

Russia's Investigative Committee spokesman Vladimir Markin said officials had launched an inquiry into a suspected “act of terror”.

“A suicide bomber who was approaching a metal detector saw a law enforcement official and, after growing nervous, set off an explosive device,”Markin said in televised comments.

Officials said at least 34 people were injured by the blast that had the explosive equivalent of more than 10 kilogrammes (16 pounds) of TNT. It was the deadliest attack in Russia for almost three years.

The police officer who spotted the woman died in the attack while several others who were stationed at the metal detectors were wounded by the blast.

State television said their actions prevented “hundreds” from being killed.

The lifenews.ru website meanwhile posted a picture of what it said was the head of the young female bomber lying amid a pile of debris with her long brown hair spread across the floor.

“It was a very powerful blast,” train station store attendant Valentina Petrichenko told the Vesti 24 news channel.

“Some people started running and others were thrown back by the wave of the blast,” she said.

“It was very scary.” Volgograd Mayor Irina Guseva vowed on Vesti 24 television: “We will not allow panic to grip this city.”

Olympic security fears

The city of Volgograd, known as Stalingrad in the Soviet era, was already attacked in October by a female suicide bomber with links to Islamists fighting federal forces in the nearby volatile North Caucasus.

The October 21 strike killed six people aboard a crowded bus and immediately raised security fears ahead of the February 7-23 Winter Games in Sochi.

The Black Sea city lies 690 kilometres (425 miles) southwest of Volgograd and in direct proximity to the violence ravaging daily in North Caucasus regions such as Dagestan and Chechnya.

Militants are seeking to impose an Islamist state throughout Russia's North Caucasus. Their leader Doku Umarov has ordered rebels to target civilians outside the region and disrupt the Olympic Games.

President Vladimir Putin staked his personal reputation on the Games' success by lobbying for Sochi's candidacy before the International Olympic Committee and then spending more than $50 billion (36 billion euros) for the event.

The Kremlin said Putin was “immediately” informed of the attack.

“The president is receiving reports as the events develop and as new information comes in, first of all, this concerns the number of people injured and killed,” Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told Russian state television.

Militant attacks have become part of daily life in the mainly Muslim Northern Caucasus but the Volgograd blast will be a particular concern to the authorities as the bomber struck a city of over one million in the Russian heartland.

The Volgograd attack is deadliest in Russia since the suicide bombing on Moscow's Domodedovo airport in January 2011 that killed 37.

'Security stepped up'

Russia's interior ministry said separately that it was immediately stepping up security at all the nation's main train stations and airports.

“These measures involve a greater police presence and more detailed passenger checks,” an interior ministry spokesman told the Interfax news agency.

Russian authorities have repeatedly vowed to take the highest security precautions in Sochi. There have been few indications to date of foreign sports fans cancelling their attendance out of security fears.

Female suicide bombers are often referred to in Russia as “black widows” women who seek to avenge the deaths of their family members in North Caucasus fighting by targeting Russian civilians.

Female suicide bombers set off blasts at two Moscow metro stations in March 2010 that killed more than 35 people.

So-called black widows were also responsible for killing more than 90 people when they took down two passenger jets that took off from a Moscow airport within minutes of each other in 2004.

BEIRUT: Former Lebanese Minister Mohamad Chatah, who opposed Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad, and four other people were killed in a massive bomb blast that targeted his car in Beirut yesterday, security sources said. Chatah, 62, a Sunni Muslim, was also a critic of Lebanon’s Shiite Hezbollah movement and an adviser to former Prime Minister Saad Al-Hariri.

His killing occurred three weeks before the long-delayed opening of a trial of five Hezbollah suspects indicted for the Feb 2005 bombing which killed former Prime Minister Rafiq Al-Hariri, Saad’s father, and 21 other people. Hezbollah has denied involvement in the 2005 attack. Preliminary UN investigations implicated Syrian officials.

The deadly car bomb that ripped through downtown Beirut shook buildings and rattled windows, triggering fear among many people that “nowhere is safe” anymore in Lebanon. The country, which fought a long civil war between 1975 and 1990, is no stranger to violence and has seen a rise in attacks linked to the fighting in neighboring Syria, but yesterday’s explosion in the heart of Beirut brought the unrest even closer to home.

Street cleaner Ali Aoun was carrying out his daily chores when the car exploded, killing six people, including prominent anti-Syria politician Mohammad Chatah. “The pressure of the blast was so powerful. All the buildings shook around me,” he said as he swept up piles of broken glass outside a badly damaged office building.  “I can’t believe I am still alive.”

Chatah was an advisor to Saad Hariri, whose late father, the billionaire prime minister Rafiq Hariri, led the rebuilding of the city centre after it was reduced to rubble in the civil war, which claimed an estimated 150,000 lives. But the elder Hariri, a prime minister, was killed in a massive explosion targeting his convoy in 2005, just blocks away from yesterday’s blast. “This area is supposed to be safe, perhaps the safest in all the country,” said Ziad, a businessman who gave only his first name.

A tweet posted on his Twitter account less than an hour before the blast accused the Shiite movement of trying to take control of the country. “Hezbollah is pressing hard to be granted similar powers in security and foreign policy matters that Syria exercised in Lebanon for 15 years,” the tweet read. The explosion sent shock waves among residents and emptied the streets in downtown where people, seeking a respite from recent turmoil, had ventured out to enjoy the Christmas and New Year holiday period.

The conflict in neighboring Syria has polarized Lebanon and ratcheted up sectarian tensions. Hezbollah has sent fighters to Syria to fight alongside Assad, who comes from the Alawite sect, a heterodox offshoot of Shiite Islam. Some of the Sunni Syrian rebel groups are linked to al Qaeda, which is also seeking to topple Assad. Former minister Marwan Hamadeh, who survived a car bombing in 2004, told Al Arabiya television: “Hezbollah will not be able to rule Lebanon, no matter how much destruction it causes or blood it spills”.

KUWAITIS SAFE
Meanwhile, Kuwait Embassy in Beirut reassured that all Kuwaitis, both citizens and diplomats, are safe and sound after an explosion. In a statement, the embassy said that all Kuwaiti citizens are safe and that it condemns such a terrorist act that led to the death of the innocent and the destruction of properties. The Embassy called on all Kuwaiti nationals to contact these local numbers in case of emergency or help: 71582888 – 71171441 – 03041166. Earlier, Kuwait Foreign Ministry advised Kuwaiti citizens to leave Lebanon for their safety. Due to the ongoing instability in the country, this cautionary advice is still in effect.

CAR WRECKED
Sources at the explosion site said Chatah was on his way to attend a meeting at Hariri’s headquarters when the explosion tore through his car. Hariri himself has stayed away from Lebanon for more than two years, fearing for his safety. A Reuters witness at the scene said his car was “totally destroyed, it is a wreck.” Chatah’s identity card, torn and charred, was found inside his car.

Iran, which backs Hezbollah, came under attack in Beirut last month. On Nov 19, two suicide bombings rocked the embassy compound in Lebanon, killing at least 25 people including an Iranian cultural attache and hurling bodies and burning wreckage across a debris-strewn street. A Lebanon-based Al- Qaeda-linked group, the Abdullah Azzam Brigades, claimed responsibility and threatened further attacks unless Iran withdraws forces from Syria, where they have backed Assad’s 2-1/2-year-old war against rebels.

The sound of yesterday’s blast was heard across the city at around 9:40 am and a plume of black smoke was seen rising in the downtown business and hotel district. It shattered glass in nearby apartment blocks and damaged restaurants, coffee shops and offices in the chic district of downtown Beirut. “I heard a huge explosion and saw a ball of fire and palls of black smoke. We run out of our offices to the streets,” said Hassan Akkawi, who works in a finance company nearby.- Agencies

LOS ANGELES: A California man who used the Internet and Facebook to connect with Al Qaeda pleaded guilty Friday to a federal terrorism charge after admitting he attempted to assist the organisation by providing weapons training, the US attorney's office said.

Sinh Vinh Ngo Nguyen, 24, unexpectedly entered the plea before US District Court Judge John F. Walter, who scheduled sentencing for March 21, prosecutors said in a statement. Reporters were not notified of his court appearance and were not present.

Nguyen faces a maximum of 15 years in federal prison.

Nguyen's lawyer, Yasmin Cader, refused to comment on his decision, quickly hanging up the phone on a reporter, and US Attorney's spokesman Thom Mrozek said prosecutors also would have no comment. The judge who accepted the plea previously had expressed scepticism about whether Nguyen had any special skills to offer Al Qaeda.

Nguyen had confessed to federal agents after he was unmasked by an undercover FBI agent posing as a recruiter for the terrorist group.

He said that he planned to offer himself as a trainer of some 30 Al Qaeda forces to ambush troops in Syria, where he had already spent five months fighting with rebels, Assistant US Attorney Judith Heinz said after his arrest in October. She said he underwent 50 hours of interrogation during which he confessed to his plan.

Nguyen's admission was contained in a plea agreement filed in federal court, according to a US attorney's press release issued after the plea was entered and accepted.

''Nguyen admitted that approximately one year ago he travelled to Syria where he joined opposition forces,'' the statement said.

''Using a social network site during a four-month period he was in Syria, Nguyen told people that he was fighting against the Assad regime and that he had had a 'confirmed kill.''

Nguyen returned to the US, where he told associates that he had offered to train Al Qaeda forces in Syria but was turned down, the US attorney's office said.

At a hearing last fall, Judge Walter asked Heinz what Nguyen had to offer the terrorist group and she said, ''He was providing himself''.

The judge noted that Nguyen was never a member of the US armed forces, having been rejected because of a hearing problem.

''I don't see evidence that this defendant had any particular skill in firearms,'' he said, ''or that he had the ability to procure or deliver weapons. ... This is the part of the case that escapes me.''

It was not immediately known what changed his mind between then and the entry of the plea.

Prosecutors said that between Aug 3 and Oct 11 Nguyen met with a man he thought was an Al Qaeda recruiter but who actually was working for the FBI, telling him about what he'd done in Syria and saying he wanted to return to jihad.

On Oct 1, Nguyen purchased a ticket for travel from Mexico to Pakistan and he was arrested by FBI agents on Oct 11 as he was about to board a bus from Santa Ana, California, to Mexico. He had been told he would be meeting ''his sheik'' in Peshawar, the prosecutor had said. When he was arrested, authorities said he exclaimed, ''How did you guys find out?''

KARACHI: Bangladesh on Tuesday sought an explanation from Pakistan’s envoy in Dhaka regarding a resolution adopted by the Pakistani parliament condemning execution of Jamaat leader Abdul Quader Molla for his involvement in war crimes of 1971.

Bangladesh's foreign ministry, in a statement, said that Molla’s trial and punishment was the country’s internal affair and the resolution adopted by Pakistan’s National Assembly in this regard was uncalled for.

Pakistan’s high commissioner in Dhaka, Mian Afrasiab Mehdi Hashmi Qureshi was summoned to explain the matter in this regard, it said.

The 65 years old Jamaat-e-Islami leader was hanged on Thursday for his involvement in war crimes during Bangladesh’s war of independence from Pakistan in 1971.

The lower house of parliament in Pakistan on Monday blew hot and cold over the execution, ending up with just an expression of “concern” by a divided house at what Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan said was “judicial murder.”

The government and its allies as well as the opposition Pakistan Tehrik-i-Insaf (PTI) of Imran Khan tried hard for a show of parliamentary consensus on the 42nd anniversary of “fall of Dhaka” as they supported a resolution proposed by the opposition Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) seeking to condemn the execution of Bangladeshi Jamaat-i-Islami’s Abdul Quader Molla.

But the opposition Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) and the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) refused to sign the draft and openly opposed it for different reasons in speeches before the house passed a toned down resolution by voice vote.

Contrary to a mild comment made by the foreign ministry on Friday, Chaudhry Nisar used some tough language in the house, saying Mr Molla’s hanging had “opened old wounds again.”

The original JI draft had wanted the house to “strongly condemn” the hanging, but an amended draft that was moved by a party member from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) province, only “expressed concern” of the house over the hanging of Molla for what it called “supporting Pakistan in 1971.”

It urged the Bangladesh government to “not revive the issues of 1971” and “terminate all cases registered against the leaders of Jamaat-i-Islami, Bangladesh, in a spirit of reconciliation.”

Country-wide protests and funeral prayers in absentia were held by the activists and supporters of the JI in Pakistan following the hanging in Dhaka.

Pakistan’s armed forces are alleged to have carried out war crimes in1971 and the Bangladesh government has been seeking a public apology from Pakistan which is yet to abide by the demand of its South Asian neighbour officially.

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